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A First-Time Pastor’s Guide to Writing Sermons

A First-Time Pastor’s Guide to Writing Sermons

Preaching God’s Word is a noble mission, but it presents its own challenges, just like any other undertaking. One of the greatest challenges of being a preacher or pastor is ensuring your sermons are high-quality…especially if this is your first time!

CHURCH TECH PODCAST
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TV
Modern Church leader
Category
Leadership
Publish date
July 6, 2023
Author
Tithe.ly

Are you a new pastor, or first time preacher? 

Preaching God’s Word is a noble mission, but it presents its own challenges, just like any other undertaking. 

One of the greatest challenges of being a preacher or pastor is ensuring your sermons are high-quality…especially if this is your first time!

Rest assured, we can help you out. 

So, how do you write an effective sermon without compromising quality? You need a structure. Here, we’ll cover the purpose of a powerful sermon and guide you through the steps of writing your first sermon. 

The Purpose of Writing a Great Sermon

Writing an effective sermon is important because it helps you when preaching to an audience. An effective sermon keeps the audience engaged so their focus won’t drift while you preach. This makes conveying your message and delivering God’s Word to them easier. 

But an effective sermon doesn’t just deliver God’s Word to your audience. It can also help them understand the lessons in the Bible so they can apply them in everyday life. Think of it this way: a great sermon guides church members to live their life in Christ.

That said, delivering a sermon is challenging. Both the leader and the audience need to prepare, so the message is received well. 

What the Bible Says About Preaching and Sermons

Preaching and sermons are essential elements of the Bible. There are over 190 verses that specifically mention preaching. 

In the Great Commission, Jesus Himself told His disciples to spread God’s Word and His teachings by preaching to people of all nations. This account is detailed in Matthew 28:18-20: 

Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

Preaching and sermons also keep people from turning away from God’s Word and only hearing what they want to hear, as stated in 2 Timothy 4:2-3: 

Preach the word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage—with great patience and careful instruction. For the time will come when people will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear.”

The importance of preaching is further emphasized in 1 Timothy 4:13: “Until I come, devote yourself to the public reading of Scripture, to preaching and to teaching.” In this passage, Paul tells Timothy to set an example for the believers by publicly reading and preaching the Bible. 

Step-by-Step Guide to Writing Effective Sermons

Sermon preparation is a lengthy process. However, having a structured approach helps you save time while maintaining a high quality standard.

Here’s a nine-step guide to writing an effective sermon:

1. Choose Topics Ahead of Time

If possible, choose sermon topics and Bible passages at least a month in advance. This prevents you from scrambling from topics at the beginning of each week and allows you to make a sermon series that’s well-connected with each other.

However, that doesn’t mean you have to always stick to this sermon plan. If God takes you in a different direction, be flexible and allow your sermon plan to change naturally.

2. Study the Passage

Studying your Bible passage helps you get a good feel of what the passage’s main message is. The passage's message will inform your sermon’s big idea.

It helps to read the context around your chosen passage instead of just the passage itself. Reading beyond the passage itself helps you understand the full picture, plus it might give you new sermon ideas along the way.

3. Create a Big Idea

By now, you should have a big idea of what the sermon is about based on the passage and its surrounding context. 

Let’s take Deuteronomy 31:6 as an example. Scripture says, “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or terrified because of them, for the Lord your God goes with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you.”

Deuteronomy 31:1-8 tells the story of how Joshua succeeded Moses as the leader of the Israelites. A major takeaway from the passage is that we shouldn’t be afraid to take a leadership position since God will help us.

4. Make the Big Idea Memorable

Once you’ve locked on to a big idea, you make it memorable. Try to deliver it in a way that makes your church members remember it the following Monday and the rest of their week. 

Think about what you want the audience to take away from the sermon and start making it more memorable from there. Use simple words that’ll stick with them and encourage them to apply the lessons in everyday life.

5. Outline the Sermon

A sermon outline can be as simple as short notes or as elaborate as mind maps. Different pastors outline sermons differently – there’s no hard-and-fast rule about outlining sermons, so use whichever method works for you. 

6. Choose How to Open and Close

Your sermon’s opening and closing are essential. A strong opening captures people’s attention and makes them want to continue listening. Meanwhile, a strong closing wraps your sermon nicely and leaves the audience with something to ponder or a tip they can apply to their lives.

7. Finalize Your Sermon

With an opening, body, and closing in place, you can make final edits and finish your sermon outline. Ask friends or other church staff about their opinions if you need extra feedback.

8. Take a Break

Spend a day off from sermon preparation. Don’t look at it just yet, so you can look at it again with fresh eyes when it’s time to practice.

9. Practice Preaching

Once you let the sermon simmer, it’s time to practice. Deliver the sermon in front of a mirror or a trusted friend, then note what went well and what can be improved.

If you’re still in doubt, practice a few more times until you’re ready to deliver the sermon.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Writing Sermons

Writing sermons isn’t an easy job, so naturally, we make mistakes every now and then. Here are some common mistakes to avoid when preparing sermons.

Not Starting With Prayer

You can’t preach God’s Word if you don’t put Him first. Always remember to pray and ask for guidance from God before starting your sermon preparations.

Skipping the Outline

It can be tempting to write your thoughts down without first outlining a sermon, especially when an idea strikes. Unfortunately, outlines are like maps. If you don’t know where you’re going or what point you’re delivering, your sermon will go around in circles without clear meaning. 

Not Including Illustrations or Stories

Stories and illustrations turn abstract concepts into something tangible that audiences can understand easier. Plus, everybody loves a good story.

Jesus also communicated in stories and parables, as recorded in Matthew 13:34: “Jesus spoke all these things to the crowd in parables; he did not say anything to them without using a parable.” 

Not Catering to Your Audience

Different groups of people communicate differently. A preaching style that works with older people might not work well with younger church members or vice versa. Write your sermons with the audience in mind and communicate in ways they can relate to.

Get Help Writing Your Sermons

Writing sermons is an important but challenging part of a pastor’s job. Fortunately, structuring your sermon writing process and avoiding common mistakes can help you make compelling and effective sermons. Sermonly is a tool that can make this task easier, with tools for organizing sermons, taking and saving notes, and even sharing your sermons. To learn more about this free tool, click here.

AUTHOR

Tithely provides the tools you need to engage with your church online, stay connected, increase generosity, and simplify the lives of your staff.

With tools like text and email messaging, custom church apps and websites, church management software, digital giving, and so much more… it’s no wonder why over 37,000 churches in 50 countries trust Tithely to help run their church. 

Are you a new pastor, or first time preacher? 

Preaching God’s Word is a noble mission, but it presents its own challenges, just like any other undertaking. 

One of the greatest challenges of being a preacher or pastor is ensuring your sermons are high-quality…especially if this is your first time!

Rest assured, we can help you out. 

So, how do you write an effective sermon without compromising quality? You need a structure. Here, we’ll cover the purpose of a powerful sermon and guide you through the steps of writing your first sermon. 

The Purpose of Writing a Great Sermon

Writing an effective sermon is important because it helps you when preaching to an audience. An effective sermon keeps the audience engaged so their focus won’t drift while you preach. This makes conveying your message and delivering God’s Word to them easier. 

But an effective sermon doesn’t just deliver God’s Word to your audience. It can also help them understand the lessons in the Bible so they can apply them in everyday life. Think of it this way: a great sermon guides church members to live their life in Christ.

That said, delivering a sermon is challenging. Both the leader and the audience need to prepare, so the message is received well. 

What the Bible Says About Preaching and Sermons

Preaching and sermons are essential elements of the Bible. There are over 190 verses that specifically mention preaching. 

In the Great Commission, Jesus Himself told His disciples to spread God’s Word and His teachings by preaching to people of all nations. This account is detailed in Matthew 28:18-20: 

Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

Preaching and sermons also keep people from turning away from God’s Word and only hearing what they want to hear, as stated in 2 Timothy 4:2-3: 

Preach the word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage—with great patience and careful instruction. For the time will come when people will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear.”

The importance of preaching is further emphasized in 1 Timothy 4:13: “Until I come, devote yourself to the public reading of Scripture, to preaching and to teaching.” In this passage, Paul tells Timothy to set an example for the believers by publicly reading and preaching the Bible. 

Step-by-Step Guide to Writing Effective Sermons

Sermon preparation is a lengthy process. However, having a structured approach helps you save time while maintaining a high quality standard.

Here’s a nine-step guide to writing an effective sermon:

1. Choose Topics Ahead of Time

If possible, choose sermon topics and Bible passages at least a month in advance. This prevents you from scrambling from topics at the beginning of each week and allows you to make a sermon series that’s well-connected with each other.

However, that doesn’t mean you have to always stick to this sermon plan. If God takes you in a different direction, be flexible and allow your sermon plan to change naturally.

2. Study the Passage

Studying your Bible passage helps you get a good feel of what the passage’s main message is. The passage's message will inform your sermon’s big idea.

It helps to read the context around your chosen passage instead of just the passage itself. Reading beyond the passage itself helps you understand the full picture, plus it might give you new sermon ideas along the way.

3. Create a Big Idea

By now, you should have a big idea of what the sermon is about based on the passage and its surrounding context. 

Let’s take Deuteronomy 31:6 as an example. Scripture says, “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or terrified because of them, for the Lord your God goes with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you.”

Deuteronomy 31:1-8 tells the story of how Joshua succeeded Moses as the leader of the Israelites. A major takeaway from the passage is that we shouldn’t be afraid to take a leadership position since God will help us.

4. Make the Big Idea Memorable

Once you’ve locked on to a big idea, you make it memorable. Try to deliver it in a way that makes your church members remember it the following Monday and the rest of their week. 

Think about what you want the audience to take away from the sermon and start making it more memorable from there. Use simple words that’ll stick with them and encourage them to apply the lessons in everyday life.

5. Outline the Sermon

A sermon outline can be as simple as short notes or as elaborate as mind maps. Different pastors outline sermons differently – there’s no hard-and-fast rule about outlining sermons, so use whichever method works for you. 

6. Choose How to Open and Close

Your sermon’s opening and closing are essential. A strong opening captures people’s attention and makes them want to continue listening. Meanwhile, a strong closing wraps your sermon nicely and leaves the audience with something to ponder or a tip they can apply to their lives.

7. Finalize Your Sermon

With an opening, body, and closing in place, you can make final edits and finish your sermon outline. Ask friends or other church staff about their opinions if you need extra feedback.

8. Take a Break

Spend a day off from sermon preparation. Don’t look at it just yet, so you can look at it again with fresh eyes when it’s time to practice.

9. Practice Preaching

Once you let the sermon simmer, it’s time to practice. Deliver the sermon in front of a mirror or a trusted friend, then note what went well and what can be improved.

If you’re still in doubt, practice a few more times until you’re ready to deliver the sermon.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Writing Sermons

Writing sermons isn’t an easy job, so naturally, we make mistakes every now and then. Here are some common mistakes to avoid when preparing sermons.

Not Starting With Prayer

You can’t preach God’s Word if you don’t put Him first. Always remember to pray and ask for guidance from God before starting your sermon preparations.

Skipping the Outline

It can be tempting to write your thoughts down without first outlining a sermon, especially when an idea strikes. Unfortunately, outlines are like maps. If you don’t know where you’re going or what point you’re delivering, your sermon will go around in circles without clear meaning. 

Not Including Illustrations or Stories

Stories and illustrations turn abstract concepts into something tangible that audiences can understand easier. Plus, everybody loves a good story.

Jesus also communicated in stories and parables, as recorded in Matthew 13:34: “Jesus spoke all these things to the crowd in parables; he did not say anything to them without using a parable.” 

Not Catering to Your Audience

Different groups of people communicate differently. A preaching style that works with older people might not work well with younger church members or vice versa. Write your sermons with the audience in mind and communicate in ways they can relate to.

Get Help Writing Your Sermons

Writing sermons is an important but challenging part of a pastor’s job. Fortunately, structuring your sermon writing process and avoiding common mistakes can help you make compelling and effective sermons. Sermonly is a tool that can make this task easier, with tools for organizing sermons, taking and saving notes, and even sharing your sermons. To learn more about this free tool, click here.

podcast transcript

(Scroll for more)
AUTHOR

Tithely provides the tools you need to engage with your church online, stay connected, increase generosity, and simplify the lives of your staff.

With tools like text and email messaging, custom church apps and websites, church management software, digital giving, and so much more… it’s no wonder why over 37,000 churches in 50 countries trust Tithely to help run their church. 

Are you a new pastor, or first time preacher? 

Preaching God’s Word is a noble mission, but it presents its own challenges, just like any other undertaking. 

One of the greatest challenges of being a preacher or pastor is ensuring your sermons are high-quality…especially if this is your first time!

Rest assured, we can help you out. 

So, how do you write an effective sermon without compromising quality? You need a structure. Here, we’ll cover the purpose of a powerful sermon and guide you through the steps of writing your first sermon. 

The Purpose of Writing a Great Sermon

Writing an effective sermon is important because it helps you when preaching to an audience. An effective sermon keeps the audience engaged so their focus won’t drift while you preach. This makes conveying your message and delivering God’s Word to them easier. 

But an effective sermon doesn’t just deliver God’s Word to your audience. It can also help them understand the lessons in the Bible so they can apply them in everyday life. Think of it this way: a great sermon guides church members to live their life in Christ.

That said, delivering a sermon is challenging. Both the leader and the audience need to prepare, so the message is received well. 

What the Bible Says About Preaching and Sermons

Preaching and sermons are essential elements of the Bible. There are over 190 verses that specifically mention preaching. 

In the Great Commission, Jesus Himself told His disciples to spread God’s Word and His teachings by preaching to people of all nations. This account is detailed in Matthew 28:18-20: 

Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

Preaching and sermons also keep people from turning away from God’s Word and only hearing what they want to hear, as stated in 2 Timothy 4:2-3: 

Preach the word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage—with great patience and careful instruction. For the time will come when people will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear.”

The importance of preaching is further emphasized in 1 Timothy 4:13: “Until I come, devote yourself to the public reading of Scripture, to preaching and to teaching.” In this passage, Paul tells Timothy to set an example for the believers by publicly reading and preaching the Bible. 

Step-by-Step Guide to Writing Effective Sermons

Sermon preparation is a lengthy process. However, having a structured approach helps you save time while maintaining a high quality standard.

Here’s a nine-step guide to writing an effective sermon:

1. Choose Topics Ahead of Time

If possible, choose sermon topics and Bible passages at least a month in advance. This prevents you from scrambling from topics at the beginning of each week and allows you to make a sermon series that’s well-connected with each other.

However, that doesn’t mean you have to always stick to this sermon plan. If God takes you in a different direction, be flexible and allow your sermon plan to change naturally.

2. Study the Passage

Studying your Bible passage helps you get a good feel of what the passage’s main message is. The passage's message will inform your sermon’s big idea.

It helps to read the context around your chosen passage instead of just the passage itself. Reading beyond the passage itself helps you understand the full picture, plus it might give you new sermon ideas along the way.

3. Create a Big Idea

By now, you should have a big idea of what the sermon is about based on the passage and its surrounding context. 

Let’s take Deuteronomy 31:6 as an example. Scripture says, “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or terrified because of them, for the Lord your God goes with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you.”

Deuteronomy 31:1-8 tells the story of how Joshua succeeded Moses as the leader of the Israelites. A major takeaway from the passage is that we shouldn’t be afraid to take a leadership position since God will help us.

4. Make the Big Idea Memorable

Once you’ve locked on to a big idea, you make it memorable. Try to deliver it in a way that makes your church members remember it the following Monday and the rest of their week. 

Think about what you want the audience to take away from the sermon and start making it more memorable from there. Use simple words that’ll stick with them and encourage them to apply the lessons in everyday life.

5. Outline the Sermon

A sermon outline can be as simple as short notes or as elaborate as mind maps. Different pastors outline sermons differently – there’s no hard-and-fast rule about outlining sermons, so use whichever method works for you. 

6. Choose How to Open and Close

Your sermon’s opening and closing are essential. A strong opening captures people’s attention and makes them want to continue listening. Meanwhile, a strong closing wraps your sermon nicely and leaves the audience with something to ponder or a tip they can apply to their lives.

7. Finalize Your Sermon

With an opening, body, and closing in place, you can make final edits and finish your sermon outline. Ask friends or other church staff about their opinions if you need extra feedback.

8. Take a Break

Spend a day off from sermon preparation. Don’t look at it just yet, so you can look at it again with fresh eyes when it’s time to practice.

9. Practice Preaching

Once you let the sermon simmer, it’s time to practice. Deliver the sermon in front of a mirror or a trusted friend, then note what went well and what can be improved.

If you’re still in doubt, practice a few more times until you’re ready to deliver the sermon.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Writing Sermons

Writing sermons isn’t an easy job, so naturally, we make mistakes every now and then. Here are some common mistakes to avoid when preparing sermons.

Not Starting With Prayer

You can’t preach God’s Word if you don’t put Him first. Always remember to pray and ask for guidance from God before starting your sermon preparations.

Skipping the Outline

It can be tempting to write your thoughts down without first outlining a sermon, especially when an idea strikes. Unfortunately, outlines are like maps. If you don’t know where you’re going or what point you’re delivering, your sermon will go around in circles without clear meaning. 

Not Including Illustrations or Stories

Stories and illustrations turn abstract concepts into something tangible that audiences can understand easier. Plus, everybody loves a good story.

Jesus also communicated in stories and parables, as recorded in Matthew 13:34: “Jesus spoke all these things to the crowd in parables; he did not say anything to them without using a parable.” 

Not Catering to Your Audience

Different groups of people communicate differently. A preaching style that works with older people might not work well with younger church members or vice versa. Write your sermons with the audience in mind and communicate in ways they can relate to.

Get Help Writing Your Sermons

Writing sermons is an important but challenging part of a pastor’s job. Fortunately, structuring your sermon writing process and avoiding common mistakes can help you make compelling and effective sermons. Sermonly is a tool that can make this task easier, with tools for organizing sermons, taking and saving notes, and even sharing your sermons. To learn more about this free tool, click here.

VIDEO transcript

(Scroll for more)

Are you a new pastor, or first time preacher? 

Preaching God’s Word is a noble mission, but it presents its own challenges, just like any other undertaking. 

One of the greatest challenges of being a preacher or pastor is ensuring your sermons are high-quality…especially if this is your first time!

Rest assured, we can help you out. 

So, how do you write an effective sermon without compromising quality? You need a structure. Here, we’ll cover the purpose of a powerful sermon and guide you through the steps of writing your first sermon. 

The Purpose of Writing a Great Sermon

Writing an effective sermon is important because it helps you when preaching to an audience. An effective sermon keeps the audience engaged so their focus won’t drift while you preach. This makes conveying your message and delivering God’s Word to them easier. 

But an effective sermon doesn’t just deliver God’s Word to your audience. It can also help them understand the lessons in the Bible so they can apply them in everyday life. Think of it this way: a great sermon guides church members to live their life in Christ.

That said, delivering a sermon is challenging. Both the leader and the audience need to prepare, so the message is received well. 

What the Bible Says About Preaching and Sermons

Preaching and sermons are essential elements of the Bible. There are over 190 verses that specifically mention preaching. 

In the Great Commission, Jesus Himself told His disciples to spread God’s Word and His teachings by preaching to people of all nations. This account is detailed in Matthew 28:18-20: 

Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

Preaching and sermons also keep people from turning away from God’s Word and only hearing what they want to hear, as stated in 2 Timothy 4:2-3: 

Preach the word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage—with great patience and careful instruction. For the time will come when people will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear.”

The importance of preaching is further emphasized in 1 Timothy 4:13: “Until I come, devote yourself to the public reading of Scripture, to preaching and to teaching.” In this passage, Paul tells Timothy to set an example for the believers by publicly reading and preaching the Bible. 

Step-by-Step Guide to Writing Effective Sermons

Sermon preparation is a lengthy process. However, having a structured approach helps you save time while maintaining a high quality standard.

Here’s a nine-step guide to writing an effective sermon:

1. Choose Topics Ahead of Time

If possible, choose sermon topics and Bible passages at least a month in advance. This prevents you from scrambling from topics at the beginning of each week and allows you to make a sermon series that’s well-connected with each other.

However, that doesn’t mean you have to always stick to this sermon plan. If God takes you in a different direction, be flexible and allow your sermon plan to change naturally.

2. Study the Passage

Studying your Bible passage helps you get a good feel of what the passage’s main message is. The passage's message will inform your sermon’s big idea.

It helps to read the context around your chosen passage instead of just the passage itself. Reading beyond the passage itself helps you understand the full picture, plus it might give you new sermon ideas along the way.

3. Create a Big Idea

By now, you should have a big idea of what the sermon is about based on the passage and its surrounding context. 

Let’s take Deuteronomy 31:6 as an example. Scripture says, “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or terrified because of them, for the Lord your God goes with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you.”

Deuteronomy 31:1-8 tells the story of how Joshua succeeded Moses as the leader of the Israelites. A major takeaway from the passage is that we shouldn’t be afraid to take a leadership position since God will help us.

4. Make the Big Idea Memorable

Once you’ve locked on to a big idea, you make it memorable. Try to deliver it in a way that makes your church members remember it the following Monday and the rest of their week. 

Think about what you want the audience to take away from the sermon and start making it more memorable from there. Use simple words that’ll stick with them and encourage them to apply the lessons in everyday life.

5. Outline the Sermon

A sermon outline can be as simple as short notes or as elaborate as mind maps. Different pastors outline sermons differently – there’s no hard-and-fast rule about outlining sermons, so use whichever method works for you. 

6. Choose How to Open and Close

Your sermon’s opening and closing are essential. A strong opening captures people’s attention and makes them want to continue listening. Meanwhile, a strong closing wraps your sermon nicely and leaves the audience with something to ponder or a tip they can apply to their lives.

7. Finalize Your Sermon

With an opening, body, and closing in place, you can make final edits and finish your sermon outline. Ask friends or other church staff about their opinions if you need extra feedback.

8. Take a Break

Spend a day off from sermon preparation. Don’t look at it just yet, so you can look at it again with fresh eyes when it’s time to practice.

9. Practice Preaching

Once you let the sermon simmer, it’s time to practice. Deliver the sermon in front of a mirror or a trusted friend, then note what went well and what can be improved.

If you’re still in doubt, practice a few more times until you’re ready to deliver the sermon.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Writing Sermons

Writing sermons isn’t an easy job, so naturally, we make mistakes every now and then. Here are some common mistakes to avoid when preparing sermons.

Not Starting With Prayer

You can’t preach God’s Word if you don’t put Him first. Always remember to pray and ask for guidance from God before starting your sermon preparations.

Skipping the Outline

It can be tempting to write your thoughts down without first outlining a sermon, especially when an idea strikes. Unfortunately, outlines are like maps. If you don’t know where you’re going or what point you’re delivering, your sermon will go around in circles without clear meaning. 

Not Including Illustrations or Stories

Stories and illustrations turn abstract concepts into something tangible that audiences can understand easier. Plus, everybody loves a good story.

Jesus also communicated in stories and parables, as recorded in Matthew 13:34: “Jesus spoke all these things to the crowd in parables; he did not say anything to them without using a parable.” 

Not Catering to Your Audience

Different groups of people communicate differently. A preaching style that works with older people might not work well with younger church members or vice versa. Write your sermons with the audience in mind and communicate in ways they can relate to.

Get Help Writing Your Sermons

Writing sermons is an important but challenging part of a pastor’s job. Fortunately, structuring your sermon writing process and avoiding common mistakes can help you make compelling and effective sermons. Sermonly is a tool that can make this task easier, with tools for organizing sermons, taking and saving notes, and even sharing your sermons. To learn more about this free tool, click here.

AUTHOR

Tithely provides the tools you need to engage with your church online, stay connected, increase generosity, and simplify the lives of your staff.

With tools like text and email messaging, custom church apps and websites, church management software, digital giving, and so much more… it’s no wonder why over 37,000 churches in 50 countries trust Tithely to help run their church. 

Category
Leadership
Publish date
July 6, 2023
Author
Tithe.ly
Category

A First-Time Pastor’s Guide to Writing Sermons

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