Church Tech

5 Examples of Great Church Websites (And Why We Think They’re Awesome)

More than ever, your church website is a critical touchpoint for members, visitors, and seekers. The best way to create an effective site? “Learn by example,” they say (After all, isn’t that how Jesus taught the disciples?) In the following article, we’re taking a look at five great examples of church websites, and why we think they’re exceptionally effective, engaging, and just plain cool to look at.

More than ever, your church website is a critical touchpoint for members, visitors, and seekers. 

Your site is not only a reflection of who you are as a church. It’s also an opportunity to engage visitors, call them to action, and provide lifegiving resources (such as sermons and livestreaming). 

But as anyone who has ever attempted to build a church website has discovered, it’s not all that simple. To build a site from complete scratch, you need knowledge of coding and design at the very least. 

Plus, visitors may have a range of goals when they come to your site. Are they looking up basic contact info? Are they interested in the most recent sermon? Or are they wanting to give money to support your group?

In short, creating a great church website is a tall order. 

The best way to create an effective site? “Learn by example,” they say (After all, isn’t that how Jesus taught the disciples?)

In the following article, we’re taking a look at five great examples of church websites, and why we think they’re exceptionally effective, engaging, and just plain cool to look at. 

5 Examples of Great Church Websites

Church Website Example #1: City Life

City Life is an Alberta-based church with a unique message: Find your place in God’s story. 


Their website showcases a church that’s fun, accessible, and Christ-centered with the following powerful features. 

An Awesome Above the Fold

“Above the fold” is marketing lingo for what’s immediately apparent to a site visitor. In other words, if something is visible without scrolling down, it’s above the fold. 

City Life makes a dynamic first impression on visitors with a unique, above the fold message that immediately engages visitors and gets them to think. The background of the message is a live, dynamic video visual of scenes from the church so that visitors can immediately get a feel for who they can expect to see on a Sunday morning. 

Call to Action

A call to action (or CTA) is typically an active button that invites the site visitor to a specific action. City Life has a call to action to “Watch Online” for site visitors who might want to check out the church’s livestreaming. The CTA is above the fold, making it easy to click without needing to scroll down. 

Loads of Personality

Quickly run through City Life’s site, and it’s not hard to see that this church is oozing with personality. With unique messaging, a blooper reel, a spunky video intro, and a detailed “Leadership” page, City Life’s site effectively uses graphics, copy, and video content to communicate exactly who they are. 

Easy to Navigate

Great websites have clear, easy user interfaces. In other words, they’re easy to navigate and explore. 

City Life’s site makes it simple to find key information on the homepage (services times and ministries), and to locate additional information in an easy to read menu across the top of the homepage. 

Church Website Example #2: Real Life Church

Real Life Church is a down to earth church based in Bakersfield, CA. Their messaging is focused on getting real with people to help them navigate everyday life with Jesus. 



Real Life Church’s website does a great job of drawing in visitors and making their message clear and accessible. Here’s how they do it. 

A rich, unique color palette. 

Color scheme might seem like an afterthought, but choosing the right brand colors can make the difference between communicating “We’re a fun, 20-something church” and “We’re a family-friendly church with a low-key vibe.”

Real Life Church leans towards the latter with their branding, and chose a rich, unique color palette: dark teal and mustard yellow, with white text. The result is a warm, inviting appearance that would appeal as much to the young mom as to the retiree. 

Easy to Follow Buttons 

Three graphic buttons directly below the fold make it simple for site visitors to take action on Real Life Church’s site: Connect, Pray, or Give. Represented by simple text and icons, these buttons drive visitors to action with minimal confusion. 

Event Calendar

Churches typically have a range of meetings and services throughout the week, along with one-time events like conferences. That being said, there’s a lot to communicate to site visitors, including times, locations, and other relevant details.

Real Life Church has two options for discovering events: a section on their homepage with a few core events, and a more detailed Event page with a full selection of regular events, such as Men’s Bible Study and Prayer. 

Newsletter Signup 

One way to stay engaged with site visitors is through a newsletter signup. Creating a slot for email signups creates a low barrier for communicating with one-time visitors who might want to learn more about your church, but who aren’t ready to register for an event or sign up for a group. 

At the bottom of every page, Real Life Church has an option for providing your email address to subscribe to a newsletter. This is a simple, subtle reminder for visitors to engage with their church without making a huge “ask.”

Church Website Example #3: Thrive Church

Based in Greeneville, TN, Thrive Church is a warm, friendly church with a simple goal: build strong people, strong relationships, and strong families through sharing God’s unconditional love. 



Thrive Church’s website is a balanced blend of simplicity and valuable information. Here’s how they engage visitors. 

Download the app. 

If your church doesn’t have an app, it’s easier than you think to build one. An app is a great way to help members and visitors engage with you on the go...and feel connected anytime, anywhere (more important than ever in a post-pandemic world!)

Thrive Church provides an immediate opportunity to download the app on their website, which a) encourages site visitors to connect in a deeper way, and b) positions them as a tech-savvy, forward-thinking church family. 

Events on the homepage. 

Many of your site visitors will do two things: Take a look at everything on your site above the fold, and then scroll right to the bottom of the homepage. 

Thrive Church doesn’t leave the “least important” information for the bottom of the page. Rather, they place upcoming events at the bottom of the page to give visitors something to get excited about. 

“Visitor friendly.”

Many churches will want to use their websites to reach out to potential visitors, as well as seekers or non-churchgoers. 

Thrive Church does a great job of reaching out with a friendly, welcoming “I’m New Here” button on the homepage. This makes it easy for anyone to visit their site and feel welcome.

A great “Give” page. 

One of the often-overlooked purposes of a church website is providing the opportunity for site visitors to tithe or make a gift. Giving should be simple on a church website; you don’t want to create a ton of barriers before your site visitors give upon the idea of giving altogether.

Thrive Church’s “Give” page is included in a menu at the top of the homepage, making it easy to find for visitors. Once visitors click on “Give,” they’re taken to a simple page with both a core message (Your Generosity is Changing Lives) and two secure, easy options to give: online or through text messaging. 

Church Website Example #4: Salt Creek Baptist Church

Salt Creek Baptist Church is an Oregon-based church with a warm, family-forward approach and a rich, 120-year legacy.



Salt Creek may have been around since the early 1900’s, but that doesn’t mean it’s stayed behind in terms of technology. They’ve got a fresh, clean website that helps visitors learn exactly who they are and how they can get involved at Salt Creek. 

Here’s what makes their website great. 

Livestreaming. 

Livestreaming services has become more important than ever, with some church members choosing to stay home from regular service. 

Salt Creek makes their livestreaming option clear and accessible. Directly below the fold, Salt Creek has a call to action to “Watch...Sunday Morning Worship Live,” along with a video player to make it easy to watch right then and there. 

A detailed sermons page. 

Many first-time visitors to a church like to check out sermons before committing to a Sunday morning service. Existing members also like to have access to sermons so that they can catch up after a weekend away, or even revisit a message if it was especially powerful. 

Salt Creek does a great job of offering a clear, easy-to-access library of current messages on their “Sermons” page, conveniently located on the menu at the top of their homepage. Visitors can filter sermons by year, series title, or even speaker. Or, they can simply scroll through the most recent sermons. 

Simplicity rules. 

Sometimes, simplicity works best, and Salt Creek Baptist chooses to keep their homepage simple with a pleasant banner graphic and bold but classic color palette: red and yellow. A quick scroll through their homepage, and visitors can also learn exactly who they are, what they teach, how to participate on Sundays, and other relevant news and updates. 

A top of page banner. 

As any leader in church knows, churches are often hiring for new positions. Hiring for the position of Children’s Ministries Director, Salt Creek strategically displays this information in a thin but visible banner across the top of their homepage. 

Church Website Example #5: La Grande Church of the Nazarene

La Grande Church of the Nazarene is an Oregon-based church with a practical, but powerful website. They don’t only offer relevant information. They also provide a few easy, unique ways to connect with them online. 


Chat function. 

You might be accustomed to seeing ChatBots on software sites or even your favorite online brand, but on a church website? Not typically. 

La Grande Church of the Nazarene has broken the mold, however, and offered a chat function on their homepage so that site visitors can skip site exploration and ask questions directly–a unique way to build relationships right off the bat. 

“Plan Your Visit.”

For new visitors or even those who don’t regularly visit church, planning a first-time visit to a church may feel a little intimidating. La Grande Church makes it simple to show up at church with a “Plan Your Visit” button at the top right corner of the page, which asks for your basic contact information and then follows up. 

A drop down menu to keep things simple. 

Drop down menus help site visitors find information quickly without being overwhelmed. They’re a great way for organizations with a lot going on (such as churches) to keep their sites organized.

La Grande Church of the Nazarene uses a drop down menu at the top of their homepage to organize information about ministries, livestreaming, and more. This gives site visitors another option for quickly locating what they’re looking for. 

Key Takeaways

After looking over a few of our favorite websites, we ended up with a few key takeaways on what makes a church website great. 

  1. Church websites should be easy to navigate. Visitors don’t want to have to think too hard to find what they’re looking for. They want a simple, intuitive experience. 
  2. Great church websites give visitors a way to respond. The goal of a website is to drive visitors to another touchpoint, whether that’s to visit on Sunday morning, sign up for an email list, or to listen to a sermon. 
  3. Church websites should be nice to look at! Aesthetics are important, and you’ll want a website that looks contemporary, clean, and graphically interesting. 

The Common Thread: Built with Tithe.ly

What do all of these sites have in common, other than the fact that they’re exceptionally effective?

They’re built with Tithe.ly

Tithe.ly makes it easy to build an awesome church website at a low cost and with minimal effort. 

Offering livestream embedding, mobile-friendly site formats, digital event calendars, and more, Tithe.ly sites are a great option for anyone who wants to create a clean, effective, and dynamic website without a background in design or coding.
To learn how you can use Tithe.ly to build a website that draws in new visitors and engages your existing members, click here.

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H2 What’s a Rich Text element?

H3 What’s a Rich Text element?

H4 What’s a Rich Text element?

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H6 What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

H4 Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

H4 How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

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Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

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5 Examples of Great Church Websites (And Why We Think They’re Awesome)

5 Examples of Great Church Websites (And Why We Think They’re Awesome)

More than ever, your church website is a critical touchpoint for members, visitors, and seekers. The best way to create an effective site? “Learn by example,” they say (After all, isn’t that how Jesus taught the disciples?) In the following article, we’re taking a look at five great examples of church websites, and why we think they’re exceptionally effective, engaging, and just plain cool to look at.

Show notes

More than ever, your church website is a critical touchpoint for members, visitors, and seekers. 

Your site is not only a reflection of who you are as a church. It’s also an opportunity to engage visitors, call them to action, and provide lifegiving resources (such as sermons and livestreaming). 

But as anyone who has ever attempted to build a church website has discovered, it’s not all that simple. To build a site from complete scratch, you need knowledge of coding and design at the very least. 

Plus, visitors may have a range of goals when they come to your site. Are they looking up basic contact info? Are they interested in the most recent sermon? Or are they wanting to give money to support your group?

In short, creating a great church website is a tall order. 

The best way to create an effective site? “Learn by example,” they say (After all, isn’t that how Jesus taught the disciples?)

In the following article, we’re taking a look at five great examples of church websites, and why we think they’re exceptionally effective, engaging, and just plain cool to look at. 

5 Examples of Great Church Websites

Church Website Example #1: City Life

City Life is an Alberta-based church with a unique message: Find your place in God’s story. 


Their website showcases a church that’s fun, accessible, and Christ-centered with the following powerful features. 

An Awesome Above the Fold

“Above the fold” is marketing lingo for what’s immediately apparent to a site visitor. In other words, if something is visible without scrolling down, it’s above the fold. 

City Life makes a dynamic first impression on visitors with a unique, above the fold message that immediately engages visitors and gets them to think. The background of the message is a live, dynamic video visual of scenes from the church so that visitors can immediately get a feel for who they can expect to see on a Sunday morning. 

Call to Action

A call to action (or CTA) is typically an active button that invites the site visitor to a specific action. City Life has a call to action to “Watch Online” for site visitors who might want to check out the church’s livestreaming. The CTA is above the fold, making it easy to click without needing to scroll down. 

Loads of Personality

Quickly run through City Life’s site, and it’s not hard to see that this church is oozing with personality. With unique messaging, a blooper reel, a spunky video intro, and a detailed “Leadership” page, City Life’s site effectively uses graphics, copy, and video content to communicate exactly who they are. 

Easy to Navigate

Great websites have clear, easy user interfaces. In other words, they’re easy to navigate and explore. 

City Life’s site makes it simple to find key information on the homepage (services times and ministries), and to locate additional information in an easy to read menu across the top of the homepage. 

Church Website Example #2: Real Life Church

Real Life Church is a down to earth church based in Bakersfield, CA. Their messaging is focused on getting real with people to help them navigate everyday life with Jesus. 



Real Life Church’s website does a great job of drawing in visitors and making their message clear and accessible. Here’s how they do it. 

A rich, unique color palette. 

Color scheme might seem like an afterthought, but choosing the right brand colors can make the difference between communicating “We’re a fun, 20-something church” and “We’re a family-friendly church with a low-key vibe.”

Real Life Church leans towards the latter with their branding, and chose a rich, unique color palette: dark teal and mustard yellow, with white text. The result is a warm, inviting appearance that would appeal as much to the young mom as to the retiree. 

Easy to Follow Buttons 

Three graphic buttons directly below the fold make it simple for site visitors to take action on Real Life Church’s site: Connect, Pray, or Give. Represented by simple text and icons, these buttons drive visitors to action with minimal confusion. 

Event Calendar

Churches typically have a range of meetings and services throughout the week, along with one-time events like conferences. That being said, there’s a lot to communicate to site visitors, including times, locations, and other relevant details.

Real Life Church has two options for discovering events: a section on their homepage with a few core events, and a more detailed Event page with a full selection of regular events, such as Men’s Bible Study and Prayer. 

Newsletter Signup 

One way to stay engaged with site visitors is through a newsletter signup. Creating a slot for email signups creates a low barrier for communicating with one-time visitors who might want to learn more about your church, but who aren’t ready to register for an event or sign up for a group. 

At the bottom of every page, Real Life Church has an option for providing your email address to subscribe to a newsletter. This is a simple, subtle reminder for visitors to engage with their church without making a huge “ask.”

Church Website Example #3: Thrive Church

Based in Greeneville, TN, Thrive Church is a warm, friendly church with a simple goal: build strong people, strong relationships, and strong families through sharing God’s unconditional love. 



Thrive Church’s website is a balanced blend of simplicity and valuable information. Here’s how they engage visitors. 

Download the app. 

If your church doesn’t have an app, it’s easier than you think to build one. An app is a great way to help members and visitors engage with you on the go...and feel connected anytime, anywhere (more important than ever in a post-pandemic world!)

Thrive Church provides an immediate opportunity to download the app on their website, which a) encourages site visitors to connect in a deeper way, and b) positions them as a tech-savvy, forward-thinking church family. 

Events on the homepage. 

Many of your site visitors will do two things: Take a look at everything on your site above the fold, and then scroll right to the bottom of the homepage. 

Thrive Church doesn’t leave the “least important” information for the bottom of the page. Rather, they place upcoming events at the bottom of the page to give visitors something to get excited about. 

“Visitor friendly.”

Many churches will want to use their websites to reach out to potential visitors, as well as seekers or non-churchgoers. 

Thrive Church does a great job of reaching out with a friendly, welcoming “I’m New Here” button on the homepage. This makes it easy for anyone to visit their site and feel welcome.

A great “Give” page. 

One of the often-overlooked purposes of a church website is providing the opportunity for site visitors to tithe or make a gift. Giving should be simple on a church website; you don’t want to create a ton of barriers before your site visitors give upon the idea of giving altogether.

Thrive Church’s “Give” page is included in a menu at the top of the homepage, making it easy to find for visitors. Once visitors click on “Give,” they’re taken to a simple page with both a core message (Your Generosity is Changing Lives) and two secure, easy options to give: online or through text messaging. 

Church Website Example #4: Salt Creek Baptist Church

Salt Creek Baptist Church is an Oregon-based church with a warm, family-forward approach and a rich, 120-year legacy.



Salt Creek may have been around since the early 1900’s, but that doesn’t mean it’s stayed behind in terms of technology. They’ve got a fresh, clean website that helps visitors learn exactly who they are and how they can get involved at Salt Creek. 

Here’s what makes their website great. 

Livestreaming. 

Livestreaming services has become more important than ever, with some church members choosing to stay home from regular service. 

Salt Creek makes their livestreaming option clear and accessible. Directly below the fold, Salt Creek has a call to action to “Watch...Sunday Morning Worship Live,” along with a video player to make it easy to watch right then and there. 

A detailed sermons page. 

Many first-time visitors to a church like to check out sermons before committing to a Sunday morning service. Existing members also like to have access to sermons so that they can catch up after a weekend away, or even revisit a message if it was especially powerful. 

Salt Creek does a great job of offering a clear, easy-to-access library of current messages on their “Sermons” page, conveniently located on the menu at the top of their homepage. Visitors can filter sermons by year, series title, or even speaker. Or, they can simply scroll through the most recent sermons. 

Simplicity rules. 

Sometimes, simplicity works best, and Salt Creek Baptist chooses to keep their homepage simple with a pleasant banner graphic and bold but classic color palette: red and yellow. A quick scroll through their homepage, and visitors can also learn exactly who they are, what they teach, how to participate on Sundays, and other relevant news and updates. 

A top of page banner. 

As any leader in church knows, churches are often hiring for new positions. Hiring for the position of Children’s Ministries Director, Salt Creek strategically displays this information in a thin but visible banner across the top of their homepage. 

Church Website Example #5: La Grande Church of the Nazarene

La Grande Church of the Nazarene is an Oregon-based church with a practical, but powerful website. They don’t only offer relevant information. They also provide a few easy, unique ways to connect with them online. 


Chat function. 

You might be accustomed to seeing ChatBots on software sites or even your favorite online brand, but on a church website? Not typically. 

La Grande Church of the Nazarene has broken the mold, however, and offered a chat function on their homepage so that site visitors can skip site exploration and ask questions directly–a unique way to build relationships right off the bat. 

“Plan Your Visit.”

For new visitors or even those who don’t regularly visit church, planning a first-time visit to a church may feel a little intimidating. La Grande Church makes it simple to show up at church with a “Plan Your Visit” button at the top right corner of the page, which asks for your basic contact information and then follows up. 

A drop down menu to keep things simple. 

Drop down menus help site visitors find information quickly without being overwhelmed. They’re a great way for organizations with a lot going on (such as churches) to keep their sites organized.

La Grande Church of the Nazarene uses a drop down menu at the top of their homepage to organize information about ministries, livestreaming, and more. This gives site visitors another option for quickly locating what they’re looking for. 

Key Takeaways

After looking over a few of our favorite websites, we ended up with a few key takeaways on what makes a church website great. 

  1. Church websites should be easy to navigate. Visitors don’t want to have to think too hard to find what they’re looking for. They want a simple, intuitive experience. 
  2. Great church websites give visitors a way to respond. The goal of a website is to drive visitors to another touchpoint, whether that’s to visit on Sunday morning, sign up for an email list, or to listen to a sermon. 
  3. Church websites should be nice to look at! Aesthetics are important, and you’ll want a website that looks contemporary, clean, and graphically interesting. 

The Common Thread: Built with Tithe.ly

What do all of these sites have in common, other than the fact that they’re exceptionally effective?

They’re built with Tithe.ly

Tithe.ly makes it easy to build an awesome church website at a low cost and with minimal effort. 

Offering livestream embedding, mobile-friendly site formats, digital event calendars, and more, Tithe.ly sites are a great option for anyone who wants to create a clean, effective, and dynamic website without a background in design or coding.
To learn how you can use Tithe.ly to build a website that draws in new visitors and engages your existing members, click here.

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