Leadership

Transitioning Staff Well

Staffing turnover dramatically increased during the global pandemic. So organizations have needed to become better at transitioning staff well for the sake of the supervisor, organization and departing staff.

Staffing turnover dramatically increased during the global pandemic. So organizations have needed to become better at transitioning staff well. Some staff that reported to me recently transitioned out. These transitions helped me examine how to do that successfully. Below are some of the insights I gained to make it a win-win-win, for the supervisor, organization and the departing staff. Hopefully these insights help you transition staff well during a season of greater influx. Also, let me know if you would like coaching to help staff transition in or out of your organization. I would love to partner with you. Let’s first look at two best practices for supervisors.

SUPERVISOR

  1. It Might Feel Personal - When a person leaves an organization, it can feel like they’re leaving you. It can feel like a breakup. Some of this is normal especially if they have been with the organization for a long time and reported to you. But some of the negative feelings that accompany staff departure can be mitigated by viewing circumstances objectively, not taking personally variables which are beyond your control. So if it does feel personal, recall the overall needs of the organization and departing staff and try your best to move past those negative feelings quickly.
  2. People Don’t Always Leave Managers - The old saying goes...people leave managers, not organizations. This is true to a degree. But sometimes people are less leaving and more going. Sometimes they aren’t leaving a bad manager but instead of going to a good career opportunity. Try to discern the difference and respond accordingly.

ORGANIZATION

  1. Don't Automatically Post The Position - After the invention of the Ford Model T, buggy whip makers slowly found themselves out of work. At some point a boss determined that position no longer needed to be replaced. After someone leaves one of your positions, don’t automatically post an opening on your website. First consider if it is still needed. Then consider how it needs to be modified. Is the goal of the position still the same? Do some responsibilities need to be added or taken away? Wrestle through present and future organizational needs and rehire for that.
  2. Consider Restructuring Options - When a position becomes open consider how it needs to be structured within the organization. It might work better reporting to someone different. It might work better moving from salary to contract. Open positions are an incredible time to pause and think through these implications afresh. And these implications have an impact over years. So don't rush back into the same structure. Even though there is a pressure to get back to business as normal, take the needed time and consider what is best and chase after that.
  3. Have A Template Ready - After someone gives you their two weeks notice, things need to happen fast for a healthy transition. So you need a basic template on hand for these moments. My template contains questions to ask and timelines to hit. Sharing in case it helps you develop your own template. 
  4. Develop Multiple Replacement Options - You might have an incredible replacement option in your mind. But it might not work out. So develop a plan a, b and c. This allows you to quickly move on in case your ideal candidate doesn’t accept the position. This also prevents you from being at the mercy of the ideal candidate during salary negotiations. Knowing you have a plan b and c empowers you to put a lid on counteroffers.
  5. Cascade Communication Quickly - There needs to be layers of communication. This communication may go as high as your senior leadership and as wide as your whole staff. It should start at the top and go to the bottom. And it should be done as quickly as possible. I recommend the next day. If you don’t share the news, someone else will. Also, the first layer of communication to your senior leadership will be the most in-depth. From there it needs to become shorter and more positive as it ripples out.

DEPARTING STAFF

  1. Try To Retain Them - If the departing staff is a high performer, never just accept their resignation letter. Instead try to retain them by resolving the reasons behind the departure. The majority of the time this doesn’t work but it's still helpful for two reasons. One, it gives you greater clarity on why they are leaving. If a matching salary doesn’t satisfy them, then it means there is more dissatisfaction to uncover. Two, it lets them know you value them. This ends the relationship on a positive note.
  2. Ask About The New Position - Once you hear the news of a transition it is tempting to mentally start developing your replacement plan. Don’t do this. Instead pause and ask to hear more about their exciting new chapter. The change they are experiencing is much larger than the change you are experiencing so treat it accordingly.
  3. Celebrate Them Well - You want the whole experience of all staff members, from start to finish, to be positive. This includes their onboarding and offboarding. So make sure to celebrate them well. Frame their departure with their highlights and what they accomplished. If you honor staff on the way out, they are more likely to honor you in return.
  4. Give Them An Opportunity To Vent Directly - Most exit interviews happen in a sanitized environment between the departing staff and HR. But there is an additional benefit of offering staff a chance to express themselves directly to you. This gives them a chance to get anything off their chest before they depart. You will have to have a thick skin and soft heart to handle this conversation. But it allows the staff to unpack any emotional baggage they acquired under your leadership. This puts them in a healthier place for their next job.

So those were my insights into transition staff well for the sake of yourself, the organization and staff members. Let me know what I missed at benstapley@gmail.com. I would love to hear from you and learn from you. Also, hit me up if you would like coaching to help staff transition in and out of your organization. I would love to partner with you. Have an awesome day.

H1 What’s a Rich Text element?

H2 What’s a Rich Text element?

H3 What’s a Rich Text element?

H4 What’s a Rich Text element?

H5 What’s a Rich Text element?
H6 What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

H4 Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

H4 How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

  • List Item 1
  • List Item 2
  • List Item 3

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Staffing turnover dramatically increased during the global pandemic. So organizations have needed to become better at transitioning staff well. Some staff that reported to me recently transitioned out. These transitions helped me examine how to do that successfully. Below are some of the insights I gained to make it a win-win-win, for the supervisor, organization and the departing staff. Hopefully these insights help you transition staff well during a season of greater influx. Also, let me know if you would like coaching to help staff transition in or out of your organization. I would love to partner with you. Let’s first look at two best practices for supervisors.

SUPERVISOR

  1. It Might Feel Personal - When a person leaves an organization, it can feel like they’re leaving you. It can feel like a breakup. Some of this is normal especially if they have been with the organization for a long time and reported to you. But some of the negative feelings that accompany staff departure can be mitigated by viewing circumstances objectively, not taking personally variables which are beyond your control. So if it does feel personal, recall the overall needs of the organization and departing staff and try your best to move past those negative feelings quickly.
  2. People Don’t Always Leave Managers - The old saying goes...people leave managers, not organizations. This is true to a degree. But sometimes people are less leaving and more going. Sometimes they aren’t leaving a bad manager but instead of going to a good career opportunity. Try to discern the difference and respond accordingly.

ORGANIZATION

  1. Don't Automatically Post The Position - After the invention of the Ford Model T, buggy whip makers slowly found themselves out of work. At some point a boss determined that position no longer needed to be replaced. After someone leaves one of your positions, don’t automatically post an opening on your website. First consider if it is still needed. Then consider how it needs to be modified. Is the goal of the position still the same? Do some responsibilities need to be added or taken away? Wrestle through present and future organizational needs and rehire for that.
  2. Consider Restructuring Options - When a position becomes open consider how it needs to be structured within the organization. It might work better reporting to someone different. It might work better moving from salary to contract. Open positions are an incredible time to pause and think through these implications afresh. And these implications have an impact over years. So don't rush back into the same structure. Even though there is a pressure to get back to business as normal, take the needed time and consider what is best and chase after that.
  3. Have A Template Ready - After someone gives you their two weeks notice, things need to happen fast for a healthy transition. So you need a basic template on hand for these moments. My template contains questions to ask and timelines to hit. Sharing in case it helps you develop your own template. 
  4. Develop Multiple Replacement Options - You might have an incredible replacement option in your mind. But it might not work out. So develop a plan a, b and c. This allows you to quickly move on in case your ideal candidate doesn’t accept the position. This also prevents you from being at the mercy of the ideal candidate during salary negotiations. Knowing you have a plan b and c empowers you to put a lid on counteroffers.
  5. Cascade Communication Quickly - There needs to be layers of communication. This communication may go as high as your senior leadership and as wide as your whole staff. It should start at the top and go to the bottom. And it should be done as quickly as possible. I recommend the next day. If you don’t share the news, someone else will. Also, the first layer of communication to your senior leadership will be the most in-depth. From there it needs to become shorter and more positive as it ripples out.

DEPARTING STAFF

  1. Try To Retain Them - If the departing staff is a high performer, never just accept their resignation letter. Instead try to retain them by resolving the reasons behind the departure. The majority of the time this doesn’t work but it's still helpful for two reasons. One, it gives you greater clarity on why they are leaving. If a matching salary doesn’t satisfy them, then it means there is more dissatisfaction to uncover. Two, it lets them know you value them. This ends the relationship on a positive note.
  2. Ask About The New Position - Once you hear the news of a transition it is tempting to mentally start developing your replacement plan. Don’t do this. Instead pause and ask to hear more about their exciting new chapter. The change they are experiencing is much larger than the change you are experiencing so treat it accordingly.
  3. Celebrate Them Well - You want the whole experience of all staff members, from start to finish, to be positive. This includes their onboarding and offboarding. So make sure to celebrate them well. Frame their departure with their highlights and what they accomplished. If you honor staff on the way out, they are more likely to honor you in return.
  4. Give Them An Opportunity To Vent Directly - Most exit interviews happen in a sanitized environment between the departing staff and HR. But there is an additional benefit of offering staff a chance to express themselves directly to you. This gives them a chance to get anything off their chest before they depart. You will have to have a thick skin and soft heart to handle this conversation. But it allows the staff to unpack any emotional baggage they acquired under your leadership. This puts them in a healthier place for their next job.

So those were my insights into transition staff well for the sake of yourself, the organization and staff members. Let me know what I missed at benstapley@gmail.com. I would love to hear from you and learn from you. Also, hit me up if you would like coaching to help staff transition in and out of your organization. I would love to partner with you. Have an awesome day.

podcast transcript

(Scroll for more)

H1 What’s a Rich Text element?

H2 What’s a Rich Text element?

H3 What’s a Rich Text element?

H4 What’s a Rich Text element?

H5 What’s a Rich Text element?
H6 What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

H4 Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

H4 How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

  • List Item 1
  • List Item 2
  • List Item 3

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

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Transitioning Staff Well

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Transitioning Staff Well

Staffing turnover dramatically increased during the global pandemic. So organizations have needed to become better at transitioning staff well for the sake of the supervisor, organization and departing staff.

Show notes

Staffing turnover dramatically increased during the global pandemic. So organizations have needed to become better at transitioning staff well. Some staff that reported to me recently transitioned out. These transitions helped me examine how to do that successfully. Below are some of the insights I gained to make it a win-win-win, for the supervisor, organization and the departing staff. Hopefully these insights help you transition staff well during a season of greater influx. Also, let me know if you would like coaching to help staff transition in or out of your organization. I would love to partner with you. Let’s first look at two best practices for supervisors.

SUPERVISOR

  1. It Might Feel Personal - When a person leaves an organization, it can feel like they’re leaving you. It can feel like a breakup. Some of this is normal especially if they have been with the organization for a long time and reported to you. But some of the negative feelings that accompany staff departure can be mitigated by viewing circumstances objectively, not taking personally variables which are beyond your control. So if it does feel personal, recall the overall needs of the organization and departing staff and try your best to move past those negative feelings quickly.
  2. People Don’t Always Leave Managers - The old saying goes...people leave managers, not organizations. This is true to a degree. But sometimes people are less leaving and more going. Sometimes they aren’t leaving a bad manager but instead of going to a good career opportunity. Try to discern the difference and respond accordingly.

ORGANIZATION

  1. Don't Automatically Post The Position - After the invention of the Ford Model T, buggy whip makers slowly found themselves out of work. At some point a boss determined that position no longer needed to be replaced. After someone leaves one of your positions, don’t automatically post an opening on your website. First consider if it is still needed. Then consider how it needs to be modified. Is the goal of the position still the same? Do some responsibilities need to be added or taken away? Wrestle through present and future organizational needs and rehire for that.
  2. Consider Restructuring Options - When a position becomes open consider how it needs to be structured within the organization. It might work better reporting to someone different. It might work better moving from salary to contract. Open positions are an incredible time to pause and think through these implications afresh. And these implications have an impact over years. So don't rush back into the same structure. Even though there is a pressure to get back to business as normal, take the needed time and consider what is best and chase after that.
  3. Have A Template Ready - After someone gives you their two weeks notice, things need to happen fast for a healthy transition. So you need a basic template on hand for these moments. My template contains questions to ask and timelines to hit. Sharing in case it helps you develop your own template. 
  4. Develop Multiple Replacement Options - You might have an incredible replacement option in your mind. But it might not work out. So develop a plan a, b and c. This allows you to quickly move on in case your ideal candidate doesn’t accept the position. This also prevents you from being at the mercy of the ideal candidate during salary negotiations. Knowing you have a plan b and c empowers you to put a lid on counteroffers.
  5. Cascade Communication Quickly - There needs to be layers of communication. This communication may go as high as your senior leadership and as wide as your whole staff. It should start at the top and go to the bottom. And it should be done as quickly as possible. I recommend the next day. If you don’t share the news, someone else will. Also, the first layer of communication to your senior leadership will be the most in-depth. From there it needs to become shorter and more positive as it ripples out.

DEPARTING STAFF

  1. Try To Retain Them - If the departing staff is a high performer, never just accept their resignation letter. Instead try to retain them by resolving the reasons behind the departure. The majority of the time this doesn’t work but it's still helpful for two reasons. One, it gives you greater clarity on why they are leaving. If a matching salary doesn’t satisfy them, then it means there is more dissatisfaction to uncover. Two, it lets them know you value them. This ends the relationship on a positive note.
  2. Ask About The New Position - Once you hear the news of a transition it is tempting to mentally start developing your replacement plan. Don’t do this. Instead pause and ask to hear more about their exciting new chapter. The change they are experiencing is much larger than the change you are experiencing so treat it accordingly.
  3. Celebrate Them Well - You want the whole experience of all staff members, from start to finish, to be positive. This includes their onboarding and offboarding. So make sure to celebrate them well. Frame their departure with their highlights and what they accomplished. If you honor staff on the way out, they are more likely to honor you in return.
  4. Give Them An Opportunity To Vent Directly - Most exit interviews happen in a sanitized environment between the departing staff and HR. But there is an additional benefit of offering staff a chance to express themselves directly to you. This gives them a chance to get anything off their chest before they depart. You will have to have a thick skin and soft heart to handle this conversation. But it allows the staff to unpack any emotional baggage they acquired under your leadership. This puts them in a healthier place for their next job.

So those were my insights into transition staff well for the sake of yourself, the organization and staff members. Let me know what I missed at benstapley@gmail.com. I would love to hear from you and learn from you. Also, hit me up if you would like coaching to help staff transition in and out of your organization. I would love to partner with you. Have an awesome day.

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